10 cool working spaces in Indonesia

10 cool co-working spaces in Indonesia

Indonesia’s startup scene is growing in a good direction. Incubators and co-working spaces are popping up across big cities to facilitate startups’ growth and development. Some are provided for free and some are paid. If you’re looking for a nice place to work, interact, collaborate, learn, and develop your startup in Indonesia, here are eight co-working spaces to consider:

BDV (Bandung Digital Valley) is a free co-working space launched by Indonesia’s largest telco, Telkom, in Bandung in December 2011. Located in the Telkom’s R&D center, it is 1,200 square meters, and the company lets people use it as a co-working space, gadget room, meeting room, and incubatee room.

BDV is built to support and facilitate technopreneurs and developer their companies or products and bridge them with their target market. Telkom says it is investing up to IDR 50 billion ($4.40 million) in the next three years in the new space.

The co-working space can hold up to 100 technopreneurs or developers. To start using the space at BDV, users only need to register themselves on its website.

CodeMargonda is the first co-working space in the city of Depok founded by Tommy Herdiansyah dan Febrian Shandy Rifano. It aims to facilitate interaction and collaboration between non-profit and for-profit startups in the local community. It offers a fully equpped space for up to 35 people, meeting rooms, and a discussion room.

A non-profit individual or team can use these services for free. But for-profit ones are required to pay. The daily rate is IDR 15,000 ($1.30) per four hours for members and IDR 25,000 ($2.20) for non-members. The monthly rate costs IDR 660,000 ($58) and IDR 7.90 million ($695.20) for a year.

Besides facilitating a space, CodeMargonda also conducts free and paid events like workshops and discussions.

3. COMMA | Jakarta

COMMA (Collaboration Matters) claims to be the first co-working space in the city of Jakarta, which was launched by seven prominent figures in the entrepreneurial scene such as Rene Suhardono (career coach and founder of ImpactFactory), Yoris Sebastian (founder of creative consulting OMG), and Dondi Hananto (founder of wujudkanID) in November 2012.

It aims to grow the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Indonesia by facilitating people from various backgrounds to interact and collaborate. Unlike other co-working spaces, which specifically cater to startups, technopreneurs, or developers, COMMA welcomes people who have different backgrounds but are interested in jumping into this industry.

COMMA can hold up to 40 people, has meeting rooms, and even has a lounge for playing Playstation and table tennis. Hot desks are available at a rate of IDR 50,000 ($4.40) per two hours. But if you want to stay longer, a membership costs IDR 3 million ($264) per month.

Ciputra GEPI Incubator (CGI) was initiated by Global Entrepreneurship Program Indonesia (GEPI) and property company Ciputra.

This startup community space aims to grow the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Indonesia with a physical space in Jakarta. The space is 520-square meters and will focus on events, meetups, networking sessions, and coaching sessions. The team plans on having at least one event each week and will do their best to keep it open and free.

Freeware is a free co-working space in Jakarta. Venture capital firm Grupara partnered with public energy company Medco Energi earlier this year to help early-stage entrepreneurs develop their company by providing a comfortable working space and community establishment.

Freeware is not limited to tech companies, but all kinds of SME businesses like fashion, services, and media. Freeware also holds regular free sharing sessions to talk about different topics every week from well known speakers in the startup industry. Freeware is quite full already as it houses 14 startups this year.

HackerSpaceBDG is a co-working space in the city of Bandung founded by Reza Prabowo and Yohan Totting. It aims to facilitate startup, community, or individual places to work and collaborate.

It offers eight dedicated spaces with full internet access that can be used for IDR 500,000 ($44) per month. The place is also occasionally used for startup events.

HackerSpaceYK is a co-working space in the city of Yogyakarta founded by Reza Prabowo and Yohan Totting. Like HackerSpaceBDG, it caters to teams or individuals from the creative industry such as startups, designers, and writers.

It offers 12 dedicated spaces that can be used for IDR 300,000 ($26.40) per month. This co-working space measures 30 square meters.

JDV (Jogja Digital Valley) is the second free co-working space launched by Indonesia’s largest telco, Telkom. It was launched in the city of Yogyakarta in August 2013. Its concept and service is similar to BDV, which encourages technopreneurs and developers to grow their companies and bridge them with their target markets. It has an 800-square meter co-working space, gadget room, meeting rooms, and incubatee rooms. The co-working space can hold up to 50 technopreneurs or developers.

Telkom will invest up to IDR 10 billion ($880,000) over the next three years in JDV. Like BDV, to use the space, users only need to register themselves on its website.

After Bandung and Yogyakarta, Telkom plans to build more Digital Valleys in other big cities like Jakarta, Medan, Surabaya, and Bali.

Hubud is the first co-working space in Ubud, Bali, founded by three expats Peter Wall, John Alderson, and Steve Munroe. This place is designed with the concept of open space surrounded by gardens and equipped with amenities such as fast internet, a printer, a scanner, a copier, and a seminar room.

For those who want to use the service, are required to register as members with a different charge, such as IDR 500,000 ($44) for 5 hours in a day or IDR 2,500,000 ($220) per month.

Pusat Kreatif Bandung, which is also an incubation center, was established by the government of Bandung. This space was launched last May and is open to the public. It offers working space, seminar rooms, 2 meeting rooms, internet access, and a lab from Intel.

(Editing by Paul Bischoff and Steven Millward)

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